Dia de Muertos - Sean and Mittie
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Dia de Muertos

Dia de Muertos

Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead) is by far my favorite holiday of the year, and spell-bindingly so with its array of vibrant marigolds and raspberry colored coxcombs, multi-colored cutout flags strung between buildings, hanging over streets, altars to the dead adorned with everything from rice and beans to candles and tequila, and last but never least, the incredible tradition of Catrina.

Dia de Muertos

Often, people outside of Mexico don’t understand Dia de Muertos and consider it morbid or confuse it with Halloween. Though the dates are close and both holidays are tied to Catholicism, they are actually quite different. For Halloween, we dress up as something scary to frighten away lurking spirits or even death itself. So, in a sense, Halloween tells us that Death is to be feared and avoided.

Dia de Muertos

Not so in the Mexican tradition, which falls on November 1 and 2 (All Saints Day and All Souls Day). Rather, life is celebrated – the memory of a loved one, including all of their favorite foods and bevies, and honoring the family lineage. Remembering ancestors is the order of the day. Mexico places great importance on Dia de Muertos. Starting with an immense reverence for family, it makes sense that this holiday is celebrated with exuberance.

Dia de Muertos

The celebration of Day of the Dead in Mexico reaches back 3000 years to the Aztecs who spent the 9th month of the Aztec calendar revering the goddess known as “the Lady of the Dead,” who is, in modern times, called the Calavera Catrina. The Catrina is still the most prominent symbol of Day of the Dead here in Mexico. Skeletons dressed in elegant dresses, gloves and enormous hats with flowers. They may appear in sculpture, rice and bean mosaics, and even as tequila drinking fools (like yours truly) who dress up as Catrinas to celebrate (with respect of course). Other symbols include delicately decorated sugar skulls (less gruesome than the real thing) and prayer flags.

Dia de Muertos

The symbol for the Day of the Dead is the Catrina, a woman dressed in fine clothing with a skeleton face. She represents the materialism that you can’t take with you when you die. Many people dress as Catrinas (or Catrins if they’re men) and parade through town or go to social events. There is an array of parties, like the Calaca Festival, and in every interaction people confront the idea of their own death with warmth and playfulness.

La Calavera Catrina (“The Elegant Skull”) initiated with a famous print by José Guadalupe Posada which showcases a wealthy woman in an elegant gown but with a skeleton face. This striking image mocking the values of the Mexican upper-class at the time still resonates today: what will you bring with you into the afterlife? Can your riches survive death?

Dia de Muertos

The modern celebration includes building altars for the loved ones who have died in the recent past or to honor long-since passed ancestors. Often, people create altars for famous public figures who have died, like Frida Kahlo or Diego Rivera. The altar usually consists of a photo of the person surrounded by their favorite things and fresh marigolds. Their favorite things typically include food and drinks, particularly of the alcoholic variety. As you can imagine the most popular booze around these parts is tequila …and so we indulge in honor of those who have gone before us and of the many agaves that died to produce our beverage of choice.

Thinking back to the first time I experienced Dia de Muertos, I remember feeling guilty, like I had barged in on a private, solemn moment – conflating the American version of death and mourning with the Mexican one. I wrote this poem, which now seems beautifully bizarre, an inappropriate response to the moment as I now

El Dia de Los Muertos

In a stolen moment,
I stood
like a thief 
with arms full of gold
watching the teary-
eyed women
place marigolds
on the homes
of the dead.

The San Miguel cemetery is bustling with life, locals and tourists alike rub shoulders as they walk along in single file lines in and out of the grounds, the sound of different mariachi bands playing along the cremation wall and through the aisles of the remembered dead.

On Dia de Muertos, there is no fear of the dead. They are honored guests, welcomed into the space of the living. They are offered their favorite snacks and drinks, like Pan de Muerto and mezcal. They’re surrounded by vibrant marigolds and deep purple coxcomb to celebrate their visit. It is a happy, shared space where both the living and the dead are at ease.

Dia de Muertos

Always in search of something more rural, more authentic (in the sense that it had been less influenced by outsiders), Sean takes me to the cemetery in Puerto del Nieto, a rural gem without another foreigner in sight. Dirt graves marked with iron crosses and decorated with coke and beer bottles. A giant agave planted at the head of a plot has grown enormous, covering the grave in its entirety. I wondered if the agave could be considered sacred, an extension of the loved one lost, feeding off their energy.

Dia de Muertos

Have you experienced Day of the Dead? Share your questions, thoughts, and experiences with us below! We love to read YOUR comments.



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